Wreck in the Sea

Classic North

Wrecks Lovers

This safari allows you to take in some of the most iconic wrecks that the Red Sea has to offer. An ideal itinerary for those new to SCUBA diving or the Red Sea, allowing you to experience world-famous wrecks and pristine reefs.

SS. Thistlegorm – Shaab Ali: Probably the most

famous of the Red Sea wrecks. The 129m English Freighter was bombed by German aviation on 6th October 1941. Today she creates an artificial reef on a sandy bottom at 32m max depth. She is home to an enormous variety of marine life and is especially popular with large schooling fish.


Small Crack – Shaab Mahmoud: This is a small split in the middle of Shaab Mahmoud’s barrier. Drift along the outside wall next to beautiful corals and colourful fish. Look for a sand slope that leads you up and through the crack. When the current is right you can fly through the 5m deep channel and be thrown out across the sandy lagoon!

Gubal Island: At the gate of the Straits of Gubal is ‘Bluff Point’, which gets its name from the turbulence created by strong currents that beat the eastern wall of the island. The wreck of the ‘Ulysses’ lies on the reef 300m north of the lighthouse, starting at 5m and sloping to 25m. ‘The Barge’ wreck, south of the lighthouse, provides divers with a fun and unusual night dive. The wrecks skeleton creates protection for all types of night creatures.


Abu Nuhas: Also known as the ‘Ships Graveyard’, this reef is dangerously positioned close to the busy shipping lanes of the Gulf of Suez. This reef has claimed more ships than any other in the area. On the north side are four wrecks laying on a sandy seafloor at the bottom of a steep sloping reef layered with table corals. Wrecks here include the Giannis D, Carnatic, Tile and Lentil Wrecks. On the south side is a safe anchorage for liveaboards and two ergs, known as Yellow Fish Reef.

Shag Rock: This large circular reef is often overlooked but offers excellent diving on pristine coral from any location on its perimeter.